Archive for May, 2019

May 7th, 2019

Telstra’s Centrelink telephone deal on hold for Department of Human Services

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Centrelink. Images Google.Full public service coverage
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Centrelink’s plans to have its call centres manned by Telstra workers have been put on hold.

The giant Department of Human Services, which runs the welfare agency, will instead hold talks with unions about alternatives to the outsourcing deal.

Fairfax revealed last month that DHS and the telco had agreed a “pilot scheme” which would see Telstra operators move into two Human Services call centres.

The news brought a furious response by public sector union the CPSU and a challenge to the Fair Work Commission, with the union claiming the move threatened 7000 DHS jobs.

The union said that Centrelink and Medicare are being “privatised by stealth” with the government looking for private companies to take over Medicare and Pharmaceutical Benefits payments while DHS file storage warehouses are being outsourced to a top a US multinational.

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The department rejected the union’s claim saying the “pilot scheme” would free-up experienced DHS call centre operators to take complex calls while the Telstra staff deal with simple matters.

After a second round of talks at the Fair Work Commission the two parties have agreed to a temporary compromise with agreeing it would take DHS take no further steps to outsource services or work to third party providers.

The department also says it will hand over documentation and information behind the proposal to contract services out to private companies.

There will also be further talks with the CPSU to discuss alternatives to contracting-out work currently done by DHS staff.

CPSU deputy president Lisa Newman said the department had changed its story several times on the outsourcing proposal.

“Getting answers about the true nature of the deal to outsource Centrelink and Medicare work to Telstra has been like getting blood out of a stone,” the union official said.

“At the time DHS claimed it just wanted to learn from Telstra – by putting 200 of the telco’s staff in its call centres.

“Now DHS is claiming that it is really about dealing with surges in demand that flow from emergencies.

“It’s time for DHS to come clean and tell us what it’s really up to – staff and the public have a right to know if this Government is planning on breaking up and outsourcing chunks of the public sector to big business.”

May 7th, 2019

Newcrest Mining’s Cadia mine keeps lid on operating costs

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Cadia operated at an “all-in sustaining cost” of $US192 per ounce during the three months to September 30, well below the $US304 per ounce and $US342 per ounce seen in the March and June quarters. Photo: AFR Cadia operated at an “all-in sustaining cost” of $US192 per ounce during the three months to September 30, well below the $US304 per ounce and $US342 per ounce seen in the March and June quarters. Photo: AFR
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Cadia operated at an “all-in sustaining cost” of $US192 per ounce during the three months to September 30, well below the $US304 per ounce and $US342 per ounce seen in the March and June quarters. Photo: AFR

Cadia operated at an “all-in sustaining cost” of $US192 per ounce during the three months to September 30, well below the $US304 per ounce and $US342 per ounce seen in the March and June quarters. Photo: AFR

Newcrest Mining’s flagship Cadia precinct is starting to hit its straps, with recent expansions allowing the New South Wales operation to reach a new low in terms of operating costs.

The gold miner has recently spent $2 billion on expansions at Cadia and the results have shown up the production and cost data for the September quarter.

Cadia operated at an “all-in sustaining cost” of $US192 per ounce during the three months to September 30, well below the $US304 per ounce and $US342 per ounce seen in the March and June quarters.

While the fall in the Australian dollar helped the equation, it is the first time in the past five quarters that a Newcrest mine produced at a cost below $US200 per ounce, and only the second time over the same period that a Newcrest mine produced below $US300 per ounce.

The September result ensured a fat margin for the Cadia operation during the quarter, given Newcrest’s average received gold price for the period was $A1393 per ounce.

A new “panel cave” has recently been completed at Cadia, which is near Orange in New South Wales, and commercial production began from the new operation on October 1.

A big part of Cadia’s low cost results is the amount of copper that is produced alongside the gold.

Newcrest managing director Sandeep Biswas welcomed the performance at Cadia.

“It is pleasing to see Cadia East Panel Cave 2 achieving commercial production so early in the financial year, which positions Cadia East well to continue to increase its contribution to the company,” he said.

All of Newcrest’s mines were profitable in the September quarter, with the company producing 561,731 ounces of gold at an overall all-in cost of $A864 per ounce.

The production levels were lower than the previous quarter because of previously advised shutdowns at the Lihir mine in particular.

Lihir has famously under-performed in recent years, but Mr Biswas recently insisted it was “fixable”.

The production numbers released today were published in preliminary form earlier this month, but were confirmed today in the formal quarterly report.

May 7th, 2019

Call to break drug silence in Tasmania

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BURNIE woman Sophie* wants to break the cycle and end the silence about drug use on the North West Coast.
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Her mother, who has used ice, speed, morphine and heroin, continues to fight her addiction.

Subsequently, being brought into a life of substance abuse and domestic violence, saw Sophie fall down the same path.

She said ice (meth-amphetamine), the worst of the drugs, was here on the Coast.

Currently clean, Sophie wants other drug battlers to come forward and speak out.

Sophie said proper drug rehabilitation facilities were lacking on the Coast.

She said the Missiondale Recovery Centre at Evandale was the closest place for drug users to get proper help.

“There needs to be something like Missiondale up here,” she said.

Sophie said her mother wanted to go to Missiondale, but she did not want to go until after Christmas because she did not want to spend her time alone. That prevented her from getting help.

“If there was somewhere on the North-West Coast she could go she would probably be there.”

Sophie also said there needed to be a greater awareness of support services on the Coast.

She said places like City Mission’s Serenity House at Sulphur Creek and The Salvation Army bridge program needed greater emphasis.

“It needs to be out there more,” she said.

“Like they say, they are doing all these things on drugs on the North-West Coast, but why not put the facilities and the programs out there?

“Schools even need to take more notice of children.”

To escape the life of drugs Sophie’s family moved from the mainland to Circular Head when she was 12.

There Sophie’s mother turned to alcohol to alleviate the drugs. Sophie soon fell victim to the lifestyle.

She watched as her mother was abused by various partners, and she too turned to alcohol. Then at age 25 she started using speed.

“It’s a cycle, it makes you feel good, as with any addiction,” she said.

“Then there comes the come down, which emphasises all your problems. Then comes a time you want to use again.

“You need to find other ways of feeling good.”

A way of feeling good for Sophie is writing and poetry.

She showed The Advocate her written notes yesterday.

“It makes me feel lighter,” she said. “It’s a sense of relief that it’s out on paper.”

Having overcome her addiction Sophie wants to help others on the Coast.

“I want to help people find their voice,” she said.

“My future is a lot clearer.

“I know what I have to do for me and I know what I have to do for others.

“I want to help people suffering in silence help themselves.”

Sophie wants the public to understand rather than judge those drug users who decide to tell their story.

“To judge is going to prevent someone from coming forward,” she said.

“For these people who do come forward it takes so much strength and so much courage.”

* The name Sophie has been used to protect the woman’s identity.

BREAK THE CYCLE: ‘‘Sophie’’ … a Burnie mother and recovering drug user. Picture: Grant Wells.

Source: The Advocate

May 7th, 2019

Gough Whitlam: readers’ photos

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When I met Gough: Your photos Jim Potter (far left) with Gough at the 75th Anniversary of Helensburgh Workmens Club in 1971.
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Jim Potter (far left) with Gough at the 75th Anniversary of Helensburgh Workmens Club in 1971.

Trish Cerminara with Gough Whitlam and an athlete in Sydney in 1973 at the State Athletics.

Bega reporter Claire Lupton with Gough Whitlam.

Jackie Lloyd and her political hero, Gough Whitlam. Gymea Tradies, at the Whitlam Oration in 2006.

Jackie Lloyd and her political hero, Gough Whitlam. Gymea Tradies, at the Whitlam Oration in 2007.

Gough Whitlam with Albury councillor Nico Matthe. Nico was first photographed with Mr Whitlam as a 10-month-old baby. Nico’s baby, 13-week-old Mackensy, is in the photo.

Former Albury Mayor Patricia Gould with a photo of herself and Mr Whitlam.

Sarah Veitch, far right, in this photo with Gough Whitlam taken circa 1986 at an Earth Week event at Sydney’s Parliament House.

Kerrielyn Clark with Gough Whitlam at Mental as Anything musician (Mambo artist) Reg Mombassa’s book launch in Manly in 1998.

Bega District News front page from 1974 featuring Gough Whitlam with former BDN editor and now ABC South East NSW news director John Leach.

This photo comes from Bathurst in December 1975. Can anyone identify the young admirer?

Another one from Bathurst. Here former PM Gough Whitlam signs an autograph for Bob Dengate at a Light on the Hill dinner.

Julie Beun interviewing Mr Whitlam in Wollongong in 1992.

TweetFacebookDid you have your own moment with Gough Whitlam? Send your photograph to [email protected]上海龙凤论坛m.au for inclusion in our gallery.

May 7th, 2019

Gough Whitlam in regional AustraliaPhotos

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Gough Whitlam in regional Australia | Photos Gough Whitlam. Picture: STEVEN SIEWERT.
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Pic: The Courier, Ballarat

Gough Whitlam in Goulburn: September 29, 1973.

Gough Whitlam speaking at Australia Day celebrations at Tamworth in 1995.

Gough Whitlam in Goulburn: September 29, 1973.

Gough Whitlam in Goulburn: September 29, 1973.

Gough Whitlam in Goulburn: September 29, 1973.

Gough Whitlam in Goulburn: September 29, 1973.

Gough Whitlam with Albury councillor Nico Matthews, who was photographed with Gough as a 10-month-old baby. Nico’s holding his 13-week-old baby Mackensy. Pic: Border Mail

Gough Whitlam in Goulburn: September 29, 1973.

Gough Whitlam in Goulburn: September 29, 1973.

Gough Whitlam in Goulburn: September 29, 1973.

Gough Whitlam meets NSW Premier Bob Askin and Rupert Hamer at the Albury City Hall. Part of a plan to promote Twin Cities as Australia’s first major growth centre. Pic: Border Mail

Gough Whitlam in Goulburn: September 29, 1973.

Gough Whitlam in Goulburn: September 29, 1973.

Gough Whitlam in Goulburn: September 29, 1973.

Gough Whitlam in Goulburn: September 29, 1973.

Gough Whitlam in Goulburn: September 29, 1973.

In Ballarat with Steve Bracks. Pic: The Courier

Gough Whitlam in Goulburn: September 29, 1973.

Gough Whitlam in Goulburn: September 29, 1973.

Gough Whitlam in Goulburn: September 29, 1973.

Gough Whitlam in Goulburn: September 29, 1973.

Gough Whitlam in Goulburn: September 29, 1973.

Gough Whitlam in Goulburn: September 29, 1973.

Former prime minister Gough Whitlam was one of many ex-politicians to attend the State Funeral of former Tasmanian Premier Jim Bacon.

Gough Whitlam in Goulburn: September 29, 1973.

Gough Whitlam in Goulburn: September 29, 1973.

Gough Whitlam in Goulburn: September 29, 1973.

Gough Whitlam in Goulburn: September 29, 1973.

Gough Whitlam in Goulburn: September 29, 1973.

The clipping of former prime minister Gough Whitlam giving Helensbugh local Pat Teudt a kiss with husband Harry Teudt in the background. Picture: Kirk Gilmour, Illawarra Mercury

Former Albury mayor Patricia Gould with photo of herself and husband Noel with Gough Whitlam. Pic: Border Mail

Gough Whitlam at opening of Travelodge, Albury. Pic: Border Mail

Gough Whitlam celebrates 30th birthday of Country Comfort Albury hotel, formerly Travelodge. PIc: Border Mail

Former prime minister Gough Whitlam was one of many ex-politicians to attend the State Funeral of former Tasmanian Premier Jim Bacon.

Gough Whitlam speaking with James Treloar at Tamworth in 1995,

TweetFacebookREDLAND CITY BULLETIN:Bowman MP Andrew Laming has paid tribute to Gough Whitlam, remembering the day he treated theformer Labor Prime Minister in hospital.”What was meant to be a cursory checkup to complete some paperwork became a two-hour discussion as he led me through a fascinating expose of Australian politics.” Read more

GOULBURN POST: Mr Whitlam was a semi-regular visitor to Goulburn,even as a young man growing up in Canberra. Once, on the Don Lane show, he spoke about growing up in the then quite small city of Canberra, and how he and some mates would hop in a car anddrive down to the “Big Smoke” of Goulburn for a night out. Read on

WELLINGTON TIMES:The President of the Wellington branch of the ALP says former prime minister Gough Whitlam will be remembered as a great leader. ‘’He was responsible for free education which really helped a battling town like Wellington’’ Leo Dawson said. Read on

NORTHERN DAILY LEADER:A deeply polarising figure, particularly in conservative strongholds like the New England/North West, Gough Whitlam last visited the region in 1995 as Tamworth’s Australia Day ambassador, also opening the new visitor’s information centre. Read more

ARMIDALE EXPRESS:Former prime minister Gough Whitlam, who died on Tuesday aged 98, paid a rare visit to Armidale when he was deputy leader of the Labor Party.It would be another 20 years before Mr Whitlam returned to the Northern Tablelands, this time to visit Tamworth, in 1995. Read more

NEWCASTLE HERALD:tributes poured in from around the world for Gough Whitlam, Hunter Labor identities Joel Fitzgibbon, Peter Morris and Bob Brown remembered their time with ‘‘the great man’’. Read more

We don’t mourn Gough Whitlam, we mourn ourselvesGough Whitlam’s policies endured, press secretary Eric Walsh saysGough Whitlam: His life in photosEditorial: Whitlam spoke with Australians, not at usWhat did Gough Whitlam actually do? Rather a lot